Dating anchor hocking bottles

Now to build 25 or so vessels in a year & produce a total of 100,000 tons means that most of them were probably vessels of about 4/5,000 tons each. A kind visitor to this site has provided an amazing amount of data to the webmaster about Sunderland shipbuilders & their ships. I have not provided images on site of the 4 pages since they might be of interest to relatively few site visitors. The image above is of a most interesting item indeed. I now see that members of the Doxford family rejoined the company in 1922 - as senior officials or as managers. 3 indicates that the vessel may then have been renamed Helvette, a name not referenced at Miramar. The fleet was managed, until 1899, from Criccieth, a small coastal village in North Wales, & then from Liverpool. She lost her masts & had to be abandoned about 20 miles NW of Lord Howe Island (off E. The crew of 26 were all saved & landed at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. long, single screw, schooner rigged, 2 masts, speed of 11 knots, signal letters JRFT. It would seem that the entire crew (28) survived & eventually, after considerable difficulty, landed at Eden, some 26 km. The Captain (Coleman) was held to be at fault at the wreck inquiry for sailing too fast in the conditions - his licence was suspended for 6 months. A 4 masted iron ship, rigged with double top sails, single topgallant sails & royal sails. And in 1898, it sailed from Cardiff, Wales, to Valparaiso, Chile, in 74 days. The vessel was last heard from on May 13 (or May 23, sources differ), 1905. Ballasky & Sons' or a name similar to that, & was hulked, in 1911, at Noumea, New Caledonia (France), in the S. An image of the vessel's figurehead may be available from e Bay vendor 'artboy53'. to launching, p#106), 7 (collision report, Evening Telegram, N. On May 1, 1906, Kate Thomas collided with & sank the steamer Blanefield, 3411 tons, off Beachy Head, Sussex. It would seem however that a Court found in favour of Kate Thomas. Eduardo Aznar & Ramon de la Sota were the 2 principals, hence, perhaps, Miramar referencing 'Aznar & Co.' Spanish sites seem to consistently refer to the vessel as Septiembre. Now there was a vessel named Sagamore, that would seem to have been 'defensively armed' when on Mar. Porter ('Porter'), a 536 ton steam barge, near Ste. Captain Snow, & about 11 of Porter's crew, safely escaped in a rowboat, while the remaining crew, five in number, & a pilot, climbed the ship's mast from which they were rescued by a Turret Age lifeboat. A., for Amsterdam & Sunderland with a cargo of pitch pine logs, a portion of which was on deck - apparently with a 10 degree list to port. 1, 1902, a major gale was encountered & the list increased significantly. In the conditions, the decision was made to jettison the deck cargo & the engines were stopped for about 7 hours to avoid damaging the propeller in the high seas. After 10 or 15 minutes, however, the captain ordered the engines to be stopped & the boats got out. Schutt & Co.' the managers, of Lbeck, Germany, & renamed Holland.

And amongst that data is a 'Report to the Shareholders' of 'William Doxford and Sons, Limited', respecting a meeting of Ordinary Shareholders held on March 11, 1907. Images of Doxford family members prominent in the history of the shipbuilding company can be seen here, in a page from a 1922 promotional booklet published by the company. The tiny white area in the middle at the bottom is a cog wheel & when it is rotated the pistons go up and down! After WW1, orders for new ships dried up, & Doxfords closed down from September 1924 to April 1927. I read that in 1946, the company took over the Palmer's Hill, Sunderland, engine works of John Dickinson & Sons Ltd. It would be good to be able to read the inquiry's actual report. Per 1 (data), 2 (page in Spanish, Principality 80% down), 3 (data), 4 (1885 ref. Believed to have been lost at Cape Horn, where wreckage, identified as being from Principality, was later found. Miramar states last spoken to at 23.30S/22.05W on May 13, 1905. Per 1 (9th item Thomas), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Y., May 1, 1906, Kate Thomas/Blanefield, but image at bottom left), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). There is some confusion as to how many died - most WWW sites state that 36 Blanefield lives were lost but read the text re Blanefield, & the bottom image at left there, which indicates that it may have been five only. 1889, name spelled Marmari), 2 [Shaw Savill, Mamari (1) 85% down], 3 (20 Nov. Houston & Company, but maybe more accurately 'British & South American Steam Navigation Company', a line which specialised in refrigerated ships, & renamed Hesione. 23, 1915, Hesione was hit by a torpedo & captured by U-41, Kapitnleutnant Claus Hansen in command, while 86 miles SE of Fastnet (SW Ireland) & en route from Liverpool to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a general cargo. Likely used to carry iron ore from Spanish mines to English ports. 1911, the vessel was en route from 'Porman' (per an e Bay listing. coast of Spain) to Maryport, Cumberland, with a cargo of iron ore. 26, 1911, the vessel ran aground on Hats Ledge, Crow Sound, Isles of Scilly, & became a total wreck. Per 1 (greatest repair story), 2 (Wikipedia, Fazilka), 3 (British India, Fazilka), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Accommodation for 12 passengers in 1st Class & 1,650 Deck Class. Per 1 (data, image), 2 (launch, ex 'The Engineer', of Apl. 7, 1901 article in 'The Republican' of Estherville, Iowa, (at left) that 'Wreckage and signs of habitation was discovered on Bikar in 1901, suggesting that the ship had come to grief there, and that the survivors had pushed off in lifeboats shortly before the discovery. Most of the above is consistent, or so it seems to the webmaster - i.e. The vessel was at Sharpness Docks, Bristol, in Feb. In 1911, the vessel was sold to Cogneti Schiaffino, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Solideo. 3, 1917 it was torpedoed without warning & sunk in North Atlantic, 150 miles west of Fastnet, (SW tip of Ireland) with the loss of 52 lives, including the Master. Porter was soon re-floated, by 'Donnelly Wreckage & Salvage Company', while Turret Age suffered negligible damage. 25, 1900, the vessel, approaching the Quarken Channel, stranded on the Sor Gadden Reef, 1 1/2 miles ESE of the Holmogadd Light (near Umea, Sweden). The ship proceeded to pass through the Rebecca Channel (E. Captain Brady became incapacitated due to fever & William Tate (first officer & brother of Arthur) assumed command. 3, 1902, Firth of Forth stranded at full speed 2 1/2 miles NW of Lavina Bank (W. Coal was discharged to lighten the vessel & with the assistance of two tugs, she was pulled off to then proceed to Newport News, Virginia, where she re-coaled. Pumping was therefore stopped (no power), water continued to flood in & at 7 a.m. G., the managers) of Emden, Germany, & renamed Caroline Hemsoth. In 1921, the vessel was sold to 'Alfred Calvert Ltd.' & registered at Poole. It was sold again, in 1926, to "Holland" Sciffahrts G.m.b. And sold again, to 'Zerssen & Co.', of Rendsburg, Germany, in 1930.

The Doxford East Yard was located on the North Sands at Palmer's Hill Quay, about where the Glass Centre is now, as was the William Pile yard through 1873. At that date there were five directors, & every one of them was a Doxford! Also as directors were, Robert Pile Doxford, Charles David Doxford, Albert Ernest Doxford & Robert Doxford. The webmaster has spent a large portion of his life creating such documents for public companies in both Canada & the U. The texts must now, & probably then also, be absolutely perfect but, truth be known, the 1906 notice texts are virtually identical to what would be said today, over 100 years later. Development work, suspended for the duration of WW1, resumed in 1919. Doxford of course used it in vessels they themselves constructed, but over a dozen other firms were licensed to also build it. But the name of Robert Pile Doxford on that patent, filed in 1920 & described above. to Vladivostok, Russia, with a general cargo, the vessel was wrecked off Taku Bar, or Tientsin Bar, nr. Shares were sold in the fleet vessels to many parties it would seem, including, of course, Robert Thomas himself. 26, (or 25) 1907, Maelgwyn's ballast shifted, presumably in bad weather. Per 1 (data, New Guinea), 2 (text, 2 images of wreck & links), 3 ('pdf' - many references), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Described as a collier but link 2 indicates that its voyages from U. In 2 days, the vessel slipped off the rocks & sank. In 1895, the vessel sailed from Astoria, Oregon, to Queenstown, Ireland, in 96 days. Hilliard, an apprentice, was granted the prestigious Sea Gallantry Medal for an incident on Nov. On May 4, 1905, the vessel left Junin, Chile, for Rotterdam with 2,600 tons of nitrate of soda. of Liverpool (or maybe, at the time, of Criccieth, in Wales). The vessel was possibly sold, in 1911, to French owners, per a long expired e Bay item, 'F. Some 1886/7 documents may exist at University of Exeter (Henry Parry Collection). Per 1 (history data), 2 (data, Kate Thomas), 3 (extensive data, India & Kate Thomas), 4 & 5 (both images), 6 (1885 ref. (Edward) Jones, shipbuilder, of Owned by 'Kate Thomas Sailing Ship Company', of Liverpool & there registered. Traded between British (mainly Cardiff) & Continental ports & South America with general cargo. 83.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of ? Built for 'La Compaa Bilbana de Navegain', of Bilbao, Spain, which company named its vessels for months of the year. Piaggio of Genoa) (Ilva is the Latin word for Elba). While en route from Genoa to Barry Roads, Ilva was sunk by submarine UC-69, Oberleutnant zur See Erwin Waner in command, 5 miles from 'Isla Colleira', Spain, (Atlantic coast) on May 4, 1917. Any help you could provide to clarify the above data would be surely welcomed! Porter proceeded to shore but sank within 5 minutes in 45 plus maybe 60 feet of water. of Gibraltar, water was reported to be entering the vessel's auxiliary bunker (No. The pumps were started & the vessel was headed towards land. Per A (e-Bay image, Oracabessa), 1 (Norway-Heritage), 2 (Furness Withy, Carlisle City), 3 (Elders & Fyffes, Oracabessa), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).

Mainly from that first website we learn that William Theodore Doxford (1841-1916) & his brother Alfred (1842-1895) joined their father in the shipbuilding business & that both were partners by 1875. Is it possible that you can provide a large image of this fine postcard? Owned 1894 thru 1907 by 'William Peterson Ltd.' ('Peterson') which company secured a contract in 1900 to haul coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, (both Canada), for Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Turret Bell was one of at least 7 turret steamers engaged in that trade. It is interesting to note that three other ships were also wrecked in that storm, which amazingly lasted two weeks, all on a 20 mile stretch of PEI coastline.

Perhaps at that point the company would have become 'W. Robert (1851-1932) & Charles (1856-1935), two younger sons also followed into the firm. And sold for the last time, in 1926, to 'Maura y Aresti', of Bilbao, Spain, & renamed Sodupe. ), 6 ('uboat.net' re Kwasind), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Peterson it would seem operated as 'Turret Steam Shipping Co. The vessel lay there for the better part of 3 long years.

176 (or maybe 177) 'turret ships' (one authoritative site says 184) were built by Doxford in the years through to 1911.

(85 so far referenced in these pages.) And a few more (6) were built by others.

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